(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Byzantine Churches In Constantinople"

CHAPTER  II
THE   CHURCH   OF   S.   JOHN   THE   BAPTIST   OF   THE   STUDION, EMIR   AHOR   JAMISSI
THE mosque Emir Ahor Jamissi, situated in the quarter of Psamathia, near the modern Greek church of S. Constantine, and at short distance from the Golden Gate (Yedi Koul6), is the old church of S. John the Baptist, which was associated with the celebrated monastery of Studius, $ po^ rov ^rovSiov. It may be reached by taking the train from Sirkiji Iskelessi to Psamathia or Yedi Koul^.1
In favour of the identification of the building, there is, first, the authority of tradition/ which in the case of a church so famous may be confidently accepted as decisive. In the next place, all indications of the character and position of the Studion, however vague, point to Emir Ahor Jamissi as the representative of that church. For the mosque presents the characteristic features which belonged to the Studion as a basilica of the fifth century, and stands where that sanctuary stood, in the district at the south-western angle of the city,3 and on the left hand of the street leading from S. Mary Peribleptos (Soulou Monastir) to the Golden Gate.4 Furthermore, as held true of the Studion, the mosque is in the vicinity of the Golden Gate,6 and readily
1  The Latin thesis of Eugenius Marin, De Studio coenohio Constantinopolitano., Paris, 18979 is a most useful work.
2  Gyllius, De top. C.P. p. 313.
3  Itintratres russes en Orient, p. 306, tradults pour la Sod ft/ de I* Orient Latin par Mdme. B, de Khitrovo.
4  Ibid. p. 231.   For all questions concerning the walls of the city I refer, once for all, to my work, Byzantine  Constantinople .- the  Walls and adjoining Historical Sites, published in 1889 by John Murray, London.
6 Paschal Chronicle, p. 726.
35